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Selenium Webdriver Tutorials

Parallel Test Execution Using Selenium Webdriver

Parallel Test Execution Using Selenium Webdriver Introduction Parallel test execution involves running a suite of automated tests in parallel as opposed to sequentially. You don’t execute your tests one by one. Rather, you take the entire batch and split it up amongst multiple servers so that each server can run a single test at a time. This techniques has some fantastic advantages to improve your overall software development life cycle. First, running your tests in parallel can significantly decrease your execution time. If you have enough resources to run all of your tests at once, then the duration of the test execution will last only as long as your slowest test. For example, if you have 100 tests and 100 virtual machines on which to run these tests, then dividing them in parallel will allow you to run 100 tests at once. If your slowest test takes two minutes to run, then that is how long it will take for the entire test suite to execute. Running these 100 tests sequentially will take you magnitudes of times longer because you can only execute one test at a time. Therefore, you need to add all of the test run times together to understand how long that will take. If we assume that each test takes two minutes to run, then running them sequentially will take 200 minutes of run time. That’s a 5000% difference! The second advantage that parallel test execution has over sequential test execution is that it gives your team a faster feedback loop. If your test suite can execute faster, then your team can have feedback faster... read more

Proper Black Box Test Case Design-part 2-Boundary Value Analysis

Proper Black Box Test Case Design - Part 2 - Boundary Value Analysis Our second post in this series focuses on efficient test case design using black box testing. The goal of these posts is to make you better at designing test cases so that you can develop higher quality systems. In-depth explanations and practice exercises are at the core of these tutorials. In part one of this tutorial, we discussed: What a well-designed test case is Different types of software testing Black Box Testing Equivalence Partitioning Boundary Value Testing Today, we are going to continue working on learning Black Box Testing techniques. Specifically, we will learn Boundary Value Testing (BVT). BVT further expands upon the concepts that you mastered in the Equivalence Partitioning Tutorial. You will utilize the equivalence partitioning technique to help you with boundary value testing. In the previous post, I started with an example of a very simple test case. I will further expand upon it here. Test Scenario Consider the following situation where a text box allows the following integers to be entered: 1 – 5 Success 5 – 9 Monkeys 9 – 11 Bananas Use your newly found skills to create equivalence classes. (See the completed example below.) You might notice that you run into an issue at all of the boundaries, or edge cases. For example, if you enter a 5, does that return a “Success” or “Monkeys”? Same goes for the 9; will that return “Monkeys” or “Bananas”? Testing the edge conditions in software testing is known as boundary value testing. Isn’t it awesome how the name makes complete sense? Boundary... read more

How to use the Tor browser with Selenium Webdriver and C#?

What is Tor Browser? Well, Tor browser is cool because it allows you to browse the web anonymously. If you take a look at your IP address in a Tor browser, you will notice that it's not the actual IP of your computer. In fact, your IP might come from a completely different country when you are using a Tor browser. As a QA Automation Engineer, I like using Tor to see how my application handles different ip addresses. You can run a test on Tor and see how the web app handles a visitor from Australia, Germany, and any other random country. You can check the performance of your app against different locations and make sure that this is acceptable to your Product Owners or clients. Furthermore, journalists like to use this to stay anonymous on the web. Some people like to use this browser to just stay anonymous in general. And others even use this browser for bad things that occur on the Deep Web (tum dum dum...). Whatever your need for using the Tor browser, I will teach you how to use Selenium Webdriver to automate that sucker. What you do with this knowledge is up to you.     Our Test Case The goal for this test case is simple: Open Tor browser using Selenium Webdriver Go to this url www.qtptutorial.net/automation-practice Select the radio button that says, “I love HP UFT” Select this: How to set up and Download Everything that you need to run Tor? Download the Tor browser here Pick the appropriate version based on your Operating System You will download an application called something... read more

Your Automation Test Sucks

                      Ugh, I am so frustrated after today. The very fact that I am sitting here the night before my holiday break writing this blog post should indicate my level of frustration. Basically, one of my managers asked me to turn off one of my automated checks until it is more stable. Although I’ve heard such silly comments before, after about 20 minutes of discussion, I realized there was no convincing him that turning off any automated check, at any point in time is never a good idea. As a result, I am here, at night, venting the bitter rage of my wounded heart upon the web. So, What is the Problem? Our group has a dedicated team that is responsible for making sure our applications stay up 24/7. This is basically a team of 2 people: an Ops person and another Engineer who is rotated weekly. Whenever this team receives production failure notices, they must look into them, figure out if they are critical to our applications and either take action to fix the problem or contact the application’s Subject Matter Expert (SME). Often, this team needs to wake up in the middle of the night and even on weekends to look at some production failures. The job sucks! I have an automated functional GUI check that runs every single hour to make sure that a user can login to our application. This automated check pulls up our website, logs in, and then validates that the application successfully loaded. One night, this test failed and the support team... read more

 

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Latest Posts On Automation Testing

Proper Black Box Test Case Design-part 2-Boundary Value Analysis

Proper Black Box Test Case Design - Part 2 - Boundary Value Analysis Our second post in this series focuses on efficient test case design using black box testing. The goal of these posts is to make you better at designing test cases so that you can develop higher quality systems. In-depth explanations and practice exercises are at the core of these tutorials. In part one of this tutorial, we discussed: What a well-designed test case is Different types of software testing Black Box Testing Equivalence Partitioning Boundary Value Testing Today, we are going to continue working on learning Black Box Testing techniques. Specifically, we will learn Boundary Value Testing (BVT). BVT further expands upon the concepts that you mastered in the Equivalence Partitioning Tutorial. You will utilize the equivalence partitioning technique to help you with boundary value testing. In the previous post, I started with an example of a very simple test case. I will further expand upon it here. Test Scenario Consider the following situation where a text box allows the following integers to be entered: 1 – 5 Success 5 – 9 Monkeys 9 – 11 Bananas Use your newly found skills to create equivalence classes. (See the completed example below.) You might notice that you run into an issue at all of the boundaries, or edge cases. For example, if you enter a 5, does that return a “Success” or “Monkeys”? Same goes for the 9; will that return “Monkeys” or “Bananas”? Testing the edge conditions in software testing is known as boundary value testing. Isn’t it awesome how the name makes complete sense? Boundary... read more

SQA QTP tutorial – WebList identified as a web element and how to select an item from this list

Hi. Today, I wanted to touch base on unorthodox objects that may appear as other objects. In my application, the web list appear as web elements and I wanted to show you a solution for selecting an item in this type of web list. In this situation, just treat it as a regular web element and you can directly click on this element to select it. Browser("index:=0").Page("title:=.*").WebElement("outertext:=UniquePropertyName, "Index:=0").Click The above code is just an example of how you can select an item out of this type of object. 1. Click on the web list so that the list opens up, use the object spy to identify the item in the list you are trying to select. 2. Then replace the identification properties in the example code above. 3. I am using index in this example because with one unique identifier, you may have trouble selecting the object. If this is the case, try switching from index 0 and 1 and you shouldn't have any problems. That's it! As easy as that! Post your comments and questions... read more

Automation QTP tutorial-double clicking on any object

Hey guys. Todays tutorial is quick. If you want to double click on any object, just identify your current browser, page, and object you want to click on. But instead of the regular click method to click on it, we will user FireEvent("ondblclick"). Browser("Index:=0").Page("title:=.*").WebElement("innertext:=unique property name").FireEvent "ondblclick" The Index of the Browser is dependent on how many browser windows you have open, and in which order the windows were opened. So if you have 2 browser windows open and you want to click on the first window, set the browser index=0. If you want to click on the second window, set the index=1. Easy right? The page title is using the .* regular expression which just means that the a specific page title is not needed. Find the generic page that is associate with the browser window. the "unique property name" for the web element can be anything. So if you have a web element with a unique property such as "WebElement1" then the code above would look like WebElement("innertext:=WebElement1") Lastly, as explained above, just use the FireEvent "ondblclick" to double click on this object. You can replicate this code for any object that you would like to click on. Post your comments and questions below! We love your... read more

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